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WikiAfrica is hosted and supported by

Wikimedia Italia

Wikimedia Italia is the official wikimedia chapter in Italy. Wikimedia Italia was the original partner and instigator of the WikiAfrica movement and has been the guardian of its brand, including this URL.

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The Wikimedia Movement in Africa Uncategorized

Wikimedia Usergroup Egypt

An officially recognised group of Wikimedia-focused volunteers in Egypt.

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#OpenAfrica

#OpenAfrica

A series of training sessions in 2014 and 2015 that developed the skills of Wikipedians from across Africa. #OpenAfrica14 took place over 4 weeks in Cape Town with delegates from Cote d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi and Uganda. #OpenAfrica14 was conceptualised by WikiAfrica was supported by Creative Commons South Africa, Prins Claus Fons and Fondation Orange.

In 2015, #OpenAfrica15 took place at the Goethe-Institut Johannesburg in December 2014 focussed on training Wikipedians in Residence and had two delegates from South Africa, and delegates from Ethiopia, Cameroon, Ghana and Nigeria. A wikipedian trainer, Gereon Kalkuhl.

#OpenAfrica15 was conceptualised by WikiAfrica in partnership with the Goethe-Institut Johannesburg, and supported by Creative Commons South Africa.

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The Wikimedia Movement in Africa Uncategorized

Wikimedia Usergroup Algeria

An officially recognised group of Wikimedia-focused volunteers in Algeria.

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The Wikimedia Movement in Africa Uncategorized

Wikimedia Usergroup Morocco

An officially recognised group of Wikimedia-focused volunteers in Morocco.

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The Wikimedia Movement in Africa Uncategorized

Wikimedia Usergroup Tunisia

An officially recognised group of Wikimedia-focused volunteers in Tunisia.

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Uncategorized

What is the Open Movement?

New media technology, the increasing prevalence of linked cellular phones, and increased access to global information sources, along with social networking and media-sharing websites, has altered the way that individuals learn, interpret, create and ‘publish’ work.

The Open Movement has evolved as individuals and institutions around the world have embraced the benefits of releasing digitised text and multi-media content that is online, free of charge, often collaborative, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Their actions remove most of the barriers – commercial and access – to knowledge and creative content. It harnesses and develops social economy, and allows for innovative education and creative exchange and support.

The Open Movement incorporates Open Access, Open Data, Open Source, Open Science, Open Education, Open Licensing and Open Content. Notable information sources and approaches that are results of the Open Online Movement include Wikipedia, Creative Commons, Khan Academy, Open Knowledge Foundation, Wikimedia projects, Open Education Resources (OER – including MITx and Coursera) and citizen journalism[1].

 


[1]The concept of citizen journalism (also known as “public”, “participatory”, “democratic”, “guerrilla” or “street” journalism) is based upon public citizens “playing an active role in the process of collecting, reporting, analyzing, and disseminating news and information.” Citizen journalism should not be confused with community journalism or civic journalism, both of which are practiced by professional journalists. Collaborative journalism is also a separate concept and is the practice of professional and non-professional journalists working together. Citizen journalism is a specific form of both citizen media and user generated content.

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Share Your Knowledge

WikiAfrica on SABC 2’s Morning Live

In March 2013, the South African Heritage Resource Agency (SAHRA) launched its ground-breaking content management system – SAHRIS.  To celebrate the launch of SAHRIS, the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) decided to dedicate 2 hours of their Morning Live show to South African heritage.

SAHRIS project’s founder and developer Nicholas Wiltshire invited WikiAfrica to attend, and explain the greater implications of SAHRIS for Wikipedia and Open Access. Also invited to reveal the landscape and implications for South Africa’s public were Creative Commons South Africa, represented by OER lead Kelsey Wiens, and the Heritage Portal, represented by founder James Ball.

SAHRIS is a fully collated database of South Africa’s heritage resources – that also enables site assessments and planning applications that has been released under the CC-BY-SA licence.

The Open Heritage team; from left The Heritage Portal’s James Ball, WikiAfrica’s Isla Haddow-Flood, SABC presenter extraordinaire Peter Ndlovu, Creative Commons SA’s OER Lead, Kelsey Weins and SAHRIS’ Nicholas Wiltshire.