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Wikimedia Usergroup Egypt

An officially recognised group of Wikimedia-focused volunteers in Egypt.

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Wikimedia Usergroup Algeria

An officially recognised group of Wikimedia-focused volunteers in Algeria.

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Wikimedia Usergroup Morocco

An officially recognised group of Wikimedia-focused volunteers in Morocco.

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Wikimedia Usergroup Tunisia

An officially recognised group of Wikimedia-focused volunteers in Tunisia.

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The Impact of WikiAfrica

WikiAfrica was started in 2006 as a collaboration between Wikimedia IT and lettera27, since then – via the support of several organisations and the work of a few people – it has grown to embrace the continent and build communities. It has been pivotal in driving the current contributions done by communities across sub-Saharan Africa.

The Wiki Africa movement timeline 2006-2017

The projects detailed below form the main backbone of the WikiAfrica movement. They have all been conceptualised, instigated and led by three members of Wiki In Africa, although until 2017 through the agency or fiscal sponsorship of different organisations.

2006

  • WikiAfrica is launched by lettera27 Foundation in collaboration with Wikimedia Italia, led by Iolanda Pensa.

2009

  • A 30’000 African contributions to Wikimedia projects by 2012 milestone is set.

2011

  • The Africa Centre begins working on WikiAfrica projects, led by Isla Haddow-Flood.
  • Share Your Knowledge is launched to involve cultural institutions in contributing to the WikiAfrica milestone.

2012

2013

2014 

2015

  • The OpenAfrica15, a week-long WIR training course training 6 Wikipedians across Africa at the Goethe-Institut in Johannesburg.
  • 2015. The second edition of Wiki Loves Africa photographic competition is held and completed under the theme Cultural Fashion and Adornment.

2016

2017

  • Wiki In Africa is registered as an NGO in South Africa.
  • Official launch of WikiFundi, a software that provides off-line editing environment that mimics the Wikipedia environment.
  • #16WikiWomen translation drive is held to celebrate International Women’s Day for Wiki Loves Women.

WikiAfrica projects across Africa since 2013

Hosts and Partners

The organisations that have hosted or are collaborating on Wiki Africa projects include:

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The Wikimedia Movement in Africa Uncategorized

Wikimedia South Africa

An officially recognised Wikimedia Chapter in South Africa. The only one on the continent. Involved directly in Wiki Loves Africa and a members is a beneficiary of Wikipack Africa.

 

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Open Foundation West Africa

The Open Foundation West Africa is a registered not for profit organisation in Ghana. Its mission is to extend the reach of Open Movement Activities in West Africa.

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Wikimedia Usergroup Ghana

An officially recognised group of Wikimedia-focused volunteers in Ghana.

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Wikimedia Usergroup Côte d’Ivoire

An officially recognised group of Wikimedia-focused volunteers in Côte d’Ivoire.

 

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Wikimedia Usergroup Nigeria

An officially recognised group of Wikimedia-focused volunteers in Nigeria.

 

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Wikimedia Planning Usergroup Cameroon

A group of Wikimedia-focused volunteers in Cameroon.

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Open Movements in Africa

As Abel Asrat, a Wikipedian in Residence from Ethiopia, explains it,

“[Open Movement] can be a platform that allows people to access contents and materials openly or it can be a social gathering and movement toward knowledge and experience sharing.”

Across Africa, several organizations are keen in allowing people access knowledge freely and openly. At the Open Advocate Training Course currently ongoing at the Africa Centre, the students – Erina, Abel, Cyriac and Michael – presented a kinda Open Movement landscape or outline in their country.

In Ethiopia, eLearning Ethiopian social network was established with the aim of introducing eLearning technology and methods to Ethiopian Universities and TVET ( Technical Vocational Education and Training) colleges in 2009. Meanwhile the Temari Net (which means Student Net) was built targeting university students. Social gathering events like TedxAddis and barcamp Ethiopia are also attracting a larger crowd who is very keen to network, connect and share ideas. Abel tells us more.

Malawi Library Information Consortium (MALICO), SchoolNet Malawi, and The White Spaces project are some of the Information Communication Technology initiatives and projects in Malawi. With regards to Open Access initiatives The Malawi National Digital Repository, National Archives of Malawi, and National Library Service – Mobile Library Services are helping shed much light on historic information in Malawi plus also increasing literacy rates in the country. Phoya explains more of these initiatives on Wiki Malawi.

The Uganda Bureau of Statistics is also a player in the open movement through provision of data that is free from bias. It also has a Resource center that is open to the public. Mapping day is an open data initiative in Uganda with partners such as Mountbatten which is an ICT company and the Fruits of Thought which is a collection of projects. Mapping Day organizes mapping events and much more that contribute to open movements such as OpenStreetMap. Learn more about Open Movements in Uganda.

The establishment of Ghana Open Data Initiative is meant to promote efficiency, transparency and accountability in governance as well as to facilitate economic growth by means of the creation of Mobile and Web applications for the Ghanaian and world markets. To build a network of Ghanaian doers, entrepreneurs and changemakers, Barcamp Ghana, a project of the Ghana Think Foundation is making fast progress with this goal and have already organized more than 25 of such Barcamp event already. The Ghana-India Kofi Annan Centre of Excellence in ICT and Tech Needs Girls initiative by Soronko Solutions are all part of some of the Open Initiatives and or Movements in Ghana.

An Africa map indicates some of the activities of other Open Movements across Africa.

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What is the Open Movement?

New media technology, the increasing prevalence of linked cellular phones, and increased access to global information sources, along with social networking and media-sharing websites, has altered the way that individuals learn, interpret, create and ‘publish’ work.

The Open Movement has evolved as individuals and institutions around the world have embraced the benefits of releasing digitised text and multi-media content that is online, free of charge, often collaborative, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Their actions remove most of the barriers – commercial and access – to knowledge and creative content. It harnesses and develops social economy, and allows for innovative education and creative exchange and support.

The Open Movement incorporates Open Access, Open Data, Open Source, Open Science, Open Education, Open Licensing and Open Content. Notable information sources and approaches that are results of the Open Online Movement include Wikipedia, Creative Commons, Khan Academy, Open Knowledge Foundation, Wikimedia projects, Open Education Resources (OER – including MITx and Coursera) and citizen journalism[1].

 


[1]The concept of citizen journalism (also known as “public”, “participatory”, “democratic”, “guerrilla” or “street” journalism) is based upon public citizens “playing an active role in the process of collecting, reporting, analyzing, and disseminating news and information.” Citizen journalism should not be confused with community journalism or civic journalism, both of which are practiced by professional journalists. Collaborative journalism is also a separate concept and is the practice of professional and non-professional journalists working together. Citizen journalism is a specific form of both citizen media and user generated content.